Sikh Religion

Education with Sikh Roots

At Khalsa School we endeavor to provide the best quality of education for our students regardless of their faith or background. We aim to cultivate knowledgeable and ethically oriented leaders who in the future, will serve and lead the communities from which they come. We seek to root our students in the values of courage in the face of adversity, of service to humanity, of justice, respect, and compassion. These values while universal, are also deeply embedded in the Sikh faith. They are timeless values that are reflected across the history and traditions of Sikh communities across the globe. The values of compassion, respect for the dignity of humanity, and integrity are necessary characteristics of ethical leadership in today’s world. In possessing a global outlook while remaining rooted in their heritage and traditions our students will be able to look to the future with confidence and optimism.

Introduction to The Sikh Faith

The Religion Department at Khalsa School plays an important role in ensuring that students are provided with the resources and materials necessary to study and explore their heritage and culture. In studying Punjabi students will learn vital language skills but also be equipped to explore the traditions and heritages of their past. In learning and reciting Kirtan, they will explore devotional literature, the musical traditions of the subcontinent, and study the skills of performance, and narration. In attending the Gurdwara, and celebrating religious festivals and holidays they will explore their cultural heritage and have moments to engage in spiritual reflection and contemplation.. Through these activities and more students will be encouraged to explore and engage with their heritage and tradition. They will, we hope, emerge from Khalsa School as ethically grounded individuals, secure in their identity but also well equipped to meet the challenges and opportunities of the future

Leadership of the Sikh community continued through the nine Gurus that succeeded him. The tenth Guru, Guru Gobind Singh appointed the Guru Granth Sahib as his successor and today continues to hold revered status in the lives of Sikh individuals and communities. It is important to distinguish the Guru Granth Sahib from that of a ‘book’ or ‘scripture’ like the Qur’an in Islam or the Bible in Christianity. Granted the status of an eternal Guru in 1708 by Guru Gobind Singh, its messages resonate across time and space. Many of the Guru Granth Sahib’s messages are progressive in nature and focused on the equality of man and women, the necessity of consultation and the ethic of democracy, as well as the importance of kind words and deeds. Many of these values and messages are continually reflected in the lives and actions of Sikh communities around the world.

The Gurdwara is a place of worship for the Sikh community and serves as a place of spiritual reflection and contemplation, social gathering, and intellectual exchange. A Gurdwara will often contain a prayer hall for spiritual gathering and reflection, as well as a kitchen and dining hall for langar.

The institution of langar, or free kitchen traces its roots to 12-13th century India. Today the practice of langar, or the distribution of meals to anyone in need has come to characterize the Sikh community’s generous spirit, care for those in need, and welcoming nature. Vegetarian meals are distributed to anyone in need without regard to socioeconomic status, race, religion,caste or background. It is also a practice that is reflective of the community’s cohesion as everyone sits together on the floor as equals, to partake in a shared meal.

The Religion Department

The Religion Department at Khalsa School plays an important role in ensuring that students are provided with the resources and materials necessary to study and explore their heritage and culture. In studying Punjabi, students will learn vital language skills but also be equipped to explore the traditions and heritages of their past. In learning and reciting Kirtan, they will explore devotional literature, the musical traditions of the subcontinent, and study the skills of performance, and narration. In attending the Gurdwara, and celebrating religious festivals and holidays they will explore their cultural heritage and have moments to engage in spiritual reflection and contemplation.. Through these activities and more, students will be encouraged to explore and engage with their heritage and tradition. We hope that they will emerge from Khalsa School as ethically grounded individuals, secure in their identity but also well equipped to meet the challenges and opportunities of the future

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